Friday, 11 January 2013

Town of Comox - Downtown Comox

Post #5 - Town of Comox - Downtown Comox

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A Pictorial View of the Comox Valley

Downtown Comox
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                                                      Town of Comox 

From the "History of the Comox Valley"  1862 to 1945 by Ben Hughes
(taken from the inside front cover)
The Cornucopia, the Horn of Plenty, depicted on the cover, was chosen as representing the abundance of the good things of the valley which the Indians named Yuculta, (Euclataw) in the dialect for the part of Vancouver Island, now called Comox.  The original full name was Komuckway or Camukthway, which means "plenty","abundance", "riches", the surrounding district having been noted among the Indians for the abundance of berries and game. The name has been spelt variously, and gradually shortened to Komoux, Comuck, Comax and finally Comox.

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                               Downtown Street Scenes

Display Located on Comox Ave across from Berwick House

Located on Comox Ave across from Berwick House near the Comox Centre Mall 
 I am not sure what this pulley is from, it is on Comox Avenue across from Berwick House. 






 Berwick House Seniors Home on Comox Ave

 
 Comox Branch of the Canadian Legion on Comox Avenue a short distance from downtown
Comox Mall, Comox Ave

Holiday Monday on Comox Ave near Comox Mall


 Vancouver Island Regional Library,
1720 Beaufort Ave, Comox, BC, V9M 1R7
comox@virl.bc.ca
The Village of Comox joined the Vancouver Island Union Library system as a book station in 1937, but withdrew in 1957. It re-entered the system as a branch in 1972.  The library branch moved to its current location in the Portside building on Beaufort Ave in 2009.

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 D'Esterre Seniors Center on Beaufort St. Comox
Officially opened in 1975 with a membership of 10 has now grown to over 800.  The land where D'Esterre House is located was donated by "Dusty" D'Esterre
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Martine's Bistro on Beaufort Ave. 




 Black Fin Pub on Port Augusta St. 
 St. Joseph's Hospital, Comox Ave., at north end of town


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The Filberg Park Gardens are only a short distance from the downtown area of Comox


 Filberg Park Gardens


             

Filberg Park, (Filberg Lodge, Filbert Tea House, Petting Zoo and home of the Filberg Festival) 

Open daily from 8AM to dusk, year round.


The Gardens are a myriad of exotic and local trees and flowers. A wonderful place for a peaceful stroll or an afternoon picnic.





The extensive gardens have many captivating features. Nine landscaped acres, with a stream running through the natural ravine provide a perfect setting for a variety of plantings such as maples and magnolias. Rare and exotic trees from many parts of the world include a selection of stately oaks, London Planes, Atlas and Deodora cedars, pines of many species and a variety of other mature trees.

 Picture from the Filberg Park website
There are beds of various annuals and perennials, and hundreds of rhododendrons, many from the famous collection of the Greig family. Heathers, spring bulbs, flowering shrubs and dwarf conifers thrive in the fine microclimate. The park is a wonderful place for a peaceful stroll or an afternoon picnic.

The Filberg Heritage Lodge and Park is part of the Vancouver Island Garden Trail, a self-directed tour of a diverse variety of stunning Island gardens.


 Picture from the Filberg Park website

  

 Herb Garden
Just above the Tea House on a sloping hill, you will find a charming herb garden, inviting to both the eye and the nose. The garden is lovingly planted and maintained by the Comox Valley Horticultural Society. This aromatic treasure thrives because of their generous donation of time and plants.

Cutting Garden
Just below the Tea House and adjacent to the Boat House is the cutting garden. Long time Comox resident and Filberg volunteer Liz Stubbs and her team of volunteers donate much of their time and energy in growing a variety of flowers during the summer months. The flowers are used in beautiful arrangements throughout the Lodge, and may be purchased in the Gift Shop.

You may also enjoy the Comox Heritage walk for interesting self guided tours of Comox and the Comox Valley

 http://filberg.com/home/about-the-park/
 Filberg Lodge,  Filberg Park, Comox

Filberg Lodge, (Filberg Lodge, Filbert Tea House, Petting Zoo, Herb Garden and home of the Filberg Festival, Art Shows and live concerts in the summer.)
61 Filberg Rd., Comox, BC, V9M2S7
Phone Number: 250-339-2715
Website: www.filberg.com
Filberg Lodge
The Filberg Lodge and nine acres of beautifully landscaped grounds are located on the harbour near the end of Comox Avenue. The estate was originally built for R.J. Filberg in 1929, and became a public facility after his death in 1977. The Heritage Filberg Lodge and and Park  Association (a non-profit society) manages and develops the property on behalf of the municipality.
The rustic Filberg Lodge is a reflection of the skills of local craftsmen in the use of stone and timber. The original stonework was done by stone mason and head gardener William Meier. The Lodge’s warm interior complements the outside appearance with extensive hand-made woodwork and stonework.
Is a stately home located on beautifully landscaped grounds a mere two minutes from down town Comox. Wander through the magnificent gardens, enjoy some refreshments at the Filberg Tea house or take the children to enjoy the Hands on Farm. Click here for more detailed information about the Filberg Park.
Filberg Lodge and Park have become a popular venue for weddingsart showsconcertsspecial events and the famous Filberg Festival.   
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